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of life. those of us who work with babies are able to enjoy the rapid growth that occurs during the child's earliest years and form deep, affectionate bonds with each baby in our care-- bonds that we now know can impact a child for life. but sometimes, caring for infants and toddlers in a group setting can be demanding and difficult. how do we know when we are doing the right thing with our infants and toddlers? what if a baby won't stop crying? what if a toddler refuses to put on her jacket? and what about those magnificent temper tantrums for which 2-year-olds are so famous? hello. i'm joanne hendrick, the author of the whole child and your guide to this video series. in this program, we're going to look at some of the important components that go into providing consistent, one-on-one relationships with infants and toddlers in group settings. we'll observe some infant and toddler programs in private child-care centers, university lab schools, and family day-care homes, and we'll hear from infant and toddler teachers who offer practical advice for working with our youngest children. read
of information, each corresponding to counting different things about the children. abstractly, in using the buttons, i've turned the children into a mathematical object, a set. and the fact that it can be a little easier to count buttons in a jar -- or count properties of a set of objects -- than it is to count kids running around the neighborhood is just the smallest of hints at the power of combinatorics. counting things, that's what combinatorics is all about. as an individual field of study, it's a relatively new one. and these days, with its strong connection to the world of computing, by providing insights into how to best organize and understand the power of the computer, it's incredibly important for modern technology. however, as cutting edge as the subject may be, its basic concerns go back to puzzles and problems from the earliest recorded evidence of mathematical thought. now, this is a facsimile of the rhind papyrus, copied around 1850 b.c. by the scribe ahmes from the now-lost text of an earlier dynasty. it was named after a scottish antiquarian, alexander henry rhind, who
are so good today. when most of us think of children with exceptional or special needs, the first thing that comes to mind is someone with obvious physical, emotional, or developmental handicaps or disabilities. catch the handles. good girl. whoop! whoa. there you go. go for it. hendrick: and in many cases, the needs of the children in our care will be apparent and obvious to us. turn. go to the door. but sometimes, difficulties take a while to show up. because we caregivers see children for such extended periods of time and we've known so many children, may be the first to recognize signs that a child may need more help and more support. notice how this teacher is observing and taking notes. it's very important for us to recognize learning challenge early, because early identification and proper intervention means that physical, emotional, or developmental conditions may be cleared up entirely, or at least the effect of the condition can be minimized. [humming] but nothing can be done, no individualized plan or program can even begin to be put into place, till the child is correctly id
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3